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Thread: my first try, give it a beating.

  1. #1

    my first try, give it a beating.



    yellow stone 70-200 F4 L IS


    Yellow Stone 17-85 (I need to get myself a 17-55 soon. this lens is a CA nightmare...)


    this last one is taken with i believe 70-200 f4L IS it's one of the mud pattern in yellow stone national park, I know brian shoots there quite often, has any of you gotten a better shot at this beautiful pattern? i can't seem to get what I had in mind.


    ideally i'd show pictures that i can't resolve how to light or compose due to harsh lighting. or subject, but i thought i'd give 2 of my ok ones and one that i can't resolve and see how it goes.. I figure my best shot would bemediocreto you pros here.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Re: my first try, give it a beating.



    A very nice series Ultima. I like the Old Faithful one.[]

  3. #3

    Re: my first try, give it a beating.



    Nice. I really like the second one. You might want to use DPP's peripheral illumination correctionfeatureon it, though.

  4. #4
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    Re: my first try, give it a beating.



    I like the first and second pictures - very nice.

  5. #5
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    Re: my first try, give it a beating.



    I like the first two a lot especially the orange/yellow in the grass in the first one.


    I've never heard of that tool in DPP, I'm only really familiar with standard tool pallet where is that?
    7d w/ BG-E7, 24-70 f2.8L, 70-200 f2.8L IS II

  6. #6

    Re: my first try, give it a beating.



    Quote Originally Posted by twistedphrame


    I've never heard of that tool in DPP, I'm only really familiar with standard tool pallet where is that?



    Here's how:


    I don't know if it will work on JPGs, I've only used it with RAW.


    Select an image and click either tools or edit image window. In the tools section, select the third tab at the top, next to "RAW" and "RGB". In the newest version the tab is called "NR/Lens/ALO", but previous versions are named differently. In the middle there is a section called "Lens aberration correction." Click the "Tune..." button. In the window that pops up check the "Peripheral illumination" box. The preview will show te change. Adjust the slider ifnecessary. Click OK.


    Hope that helps!

  7. #7
    Senior Member
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    Re: my first try, give it a beating.



    Apparently I had DPP v2.2 now that I'm all updated I can do that now. thanks haha
    7d w/ BG-E7, 24-70 f2.8L, 70-200 f2.8L IS II

  8. #8

    Re: my first try, give it a beating.

    <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;" class="MsoNormal"]<span style="font-size: small; font-family: Calibri;"]Nothing to beat, only pleasure that a) you captured interesting images and b) you shared them. The sky in the first is definitely interesting, but something of a distraction from the main focus. I would crop and re-frame your shot vertically around the geyser, keeping some of that amazing foreground colour for contrast. Of the three, the second is definitely my favourite for its drama and composition (although there seems to be quite a lot of vignetting). Perhaps correcting for that or bringing out the foreground would make it even better. I&rsquo;m not quite sold on the third. Perhaps from a lower angle? But it&rsquo;s diamond sharp and there&rsquo;s that silkiness you&rsquo;ve captured, which make it quite impressive. You might try post-processing the third as a high-contrast mono just for kicks. I find that a single material dominating a shot (skin, rock, stone, whatever) can usually be very enjoyable in black and white.
    <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;" class="MsoNormal"]<span style="font-size: small; font-family: Calibri;"]All in all, I&rsquo;m impressed by what you&rsquo;ve done and look forward to seeing more.

  9. #9

    Re: my first try, give it a beating.



    thank you all, I agree for the first image the bright sky is taking a bit away from thegeyser, and both image is a bit heavy handed with vignetting. I'll also try to play with b/w for the 3rd image, it's very difficult for me as they are grey mud, super low contrast, with thin layer of water flowing over it so in a sense I can't really shoot it during a brighter situation otherwise the water would show reflection, and when it's overcast there's no contrast, it's mind boggling when you see the mud slide pattern in person... I meantrulya work of God, I just can't get over that fact that I'm not even close to being able to capture the beautiful pattern.

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