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Thread: High Key Portrait - 1st Attempt

  1. #11
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    Re: High Key Portrait - 1st Attempt



    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Elberson
    Here's the RAW conversion from DPP. I just knocked down the contrast a little. I hope to take another try at this and when I do I'll post that photo.

    Mark,


    Remember, High-Key doesn't mean washed out. Here's one of a series I did of my youngest for My Mom.



  2. #12
    Senior Member Mark Elberson's Avatar
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    Re: High Key Portrait - 1st Attempt



    Cool pic Chuck. Maybe I missunderstood what High Key really was. I thought the purpose was overexpose the highlights and to retain detail in the shadows. Here's an example from Wikipedia. Do you think this acurately represents high key? Not trying to be a wise guy. Just trying to learn





    [img]/cfs-file.ashx/__key/CommunityServer.Components.UserFiles/00.00.00.26.13/High_5F00_key_5F00_baby.JPG[/img]

  3. #13
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    Re: High Key Portrait - 1st Attempt



    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Elberson
    Do you think this acurately represents high key

    Personally, No.


    It is high key, but I would think that there is also an additionalname for this style.


    Here is what I consider to be high key
    <h2><span style="font-size: small; color: #808080; font-family: Arial;"]Lighting Techniques for High Key Portrait Photography</h2>


    To me, high-key is a portrait style that uses a light background(usually white) and good lighting which wraps the subject in light. The result is a lumination and smoothing of the skin. The subject seems wrapped and bathed in light. It does not mean that the subject is washed out.


    Would you considerthis high-key?





    I would. Then again, I could be wrong.

  4. #14
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    Re: High Key Portrait - 1st Attempt



    Mark,


    May I post a processed version ofyour photo?

  5. #15
    Senior Member Mark Elberson's Avatar
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    Re: High Key Portrait - 1st Attempt



    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Lee


    Mark,


    May I post a processed version ofyour photo?
    <div style="CLEAR: both"]</div>

    Absolutely! I'll reprocess the RAW and try to bring some detail back for you so it's not so washed out.


    [img]/cfs-file.ashx/__key/CommunityServer.Components.UserFiles/00.00.00.26.13/2009_2D00_10_2D00_10_2D00_12_2D00_10_2D00_27.JPG[/img]

  6. #16
    Administrator Sean Setters's Avatar
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    Re: High Key Portrait - 1st Attempt



    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Elberson
    Do you think this acurately represents high key?

    I'd say that picture from Wikipedia exemplifies high-key portraiture. That's what I think of when the term is used.


    When I said knock down the contrast, I didn't mean in post. The problem is when you knock down the contrast in post, you basically kill all your highlights. The problem with high-key portraiture is that you need about 4 lights to do it right--two on the background and two on the subject (at least when photographing an adult). In my personal opinion, Chuck, simply having a white background isn't enough--and I wouldn't consider the photo you posted to be high key. That said, I could be wrong too... ;-)

  7. #17
    Senior Member Mark Elberson's Avatar
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    Re: High Key Portrait - 1st Attempt



    Quote Originally Posted by Sean Setters


    When I said knock down the contrast, I didn't mean in post.


    I know :-) I was just trying to get the best out of what I already had. I am very much looking forward to attempting this again. I'm not even sure if I really like high key (I did like that baby portrait) but Iwas intrigued and wanted to give it a try. I have 4 lights so I'll try your setup. I'll also try the Keith B suggested. I think that required 3 or 4 lights as well (maybe more!). Once I give this a 2nd whirl I'll share those too.

  8. #18
    Administrator Sean Setters's Avatar
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    Re: High Key Portrait - 1st Attempt



    Great....looking forward to seeing it!

  9. #19
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    Re: High Key Portrait - 1st Attempt



    Here's what I was thinking: Obviously, I have some misconceptions about what high-key is.





    I'm looking at Lighting Essential Techniques from [url="http://www.phototechmag.com/]Preston Publications[/url] and did a search for "high-key" there is an example sitedof a bride on a white background. It say's "This is classic high-key lighting: pure white background, white clothes, brightly lit, with no flare or loss of detail." Sorta sounds like the second example I posted.


    They define high-key as: "A traditional high-key photo is one with most of the tones above middle gray, with a white or very light background. The feeling is upbeat, happy, and full of energy."<span style="font-size: small; color: #272627; font-family: Sabon-Roman;"]<span style="font-size: small; color: #272627; font-family: Sabon-Roman;"]<span style="font-size: small; color: #272627; font-family: Sabon-Roman;"]


    I personally considered "high-key" as brighter backgroundthan subject outline which isolates and draws attention to the subject. I consider "low-key" as dark(er) background with subject isolated by highlights. I consider "mid key" as portraiture that uses background elements that compliment the subject. Usually, background and subject share the same tonal ranges. I do not know if this would describe a subject photographed against a bright color or brightly colored object.


    Now, there is a technique used quite frequently now, that blows out everything so that the subject blends into the white background just like the picture of the infant from wikipedia. I guess you could say it's high-key but it's not what I would consider the classic definition.


    Then again, I could be wrong. []

  10. #20
    Administrator Sean Setters's Avatar
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    Re: High Key Portrait - 1st Attempt



    hehe...and from now on all Chuck's and my posts all have to end with, "Then again, I could be wrong" from now on!


    Ok, I thought I'd have a go at it. My version:


    [img]/cfs-file.ashx/__key/CommunityServer.Components.UserFiles/00.00.00.21.08/hk_5F00_edit.jpg[/img]


    I think the best way to achieve the high-key look is to do some dodging on the areas where you see shadows. " High-key lighting is a style of lighting for film, television, or photography that aims to reduce the lighting ratio present in the scene." Chuck's right in that high-key photography isn't limited to black &amp; white photos where the highlights are so blown out that they mesh with the background. However, that is a popular form of high-key photography--so popular, in fact, that the term is now epitomized by those particular traits.

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