Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 44

Thread: Canon DSLR for beginners... help pls :(

  1. #11
    Senior Member thekingb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    512

    Re: Canon DSLR for beginners... help pls :(



    I agree with neuroanatomist: if you're not sure how serious you will be about photography, get the XS with the 18-55 IS kit lens and the nifty fifty ($600 total). Great way to start. Remember you still need to get a decent SD card and case too.


    If you want the 550D, here's a wrinkle: packaged with the kit lens it is hard to find online right now at the right price. It's out of stock at B&H and Adorama and way overpriced through an Amazon reseller. It should cost $900 as a kit and $800 for just the body.

  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    325

    Re: Canon DSLR for beginners... help pls :(



    Quote Originally Posted by thekingb
    and case too.




    I still don't have a case :P I just use my regular backpack.

  3. #13
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    12

    Re: Canon DSLR for beginners... help pls :(



    @neuroanatomist -- one more option for me then





    sorry if im pestering u guys too much, its jus that im not able to decide and since its my first DSLR its all the more hard to decide


    now im thinking about buying a 1000D and investing in lens coz, from wat i understood lenses never get outdated, so after two yrs when i start earning i can buy a high end DSLR and still use the same lens . so now comes the harder part, the lens


    i like to shoot tiny things ( the macro mode on my powershot has been very satisfying ), portraits n landscape.


    1. guess the 18-55 kinda covers landscape n portraits but is it good while used indoors?


    2. and can i use a 85mm f/1.8 for portraits indoors?



  4. #14
    Senior Member neuroanatomist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    3,716

    Re: Canon DSLR for beginners... help pls :(



    Quote Originally Posted by Bujji
    guess the 18-55 kinda covers landscape n portraits but is it good while used indoors?

    Not great for portraits - the narrow aperture means you won't get much background blur. Also, not very good indoors - you'll need flash.


    Quote Originally Posted by Bujji
    can i use a 85mm f/1.8 for portraits indoors?

    Absolutely! It's a great lens for portraits and the wide aperture means it's usable indoors. But, you'll get pretty tight portraits (head/shoulders) unless you have pretty big rooms.


    Quote Originally Posted by Bujji
    i like to shoot tiny things ( the macro mode on my powershot has been very satisfying ), portraits n landscape.

    You might consider the EF-S 60mm f/2.8 Macro - it's not as fast as the 85mm f/1.8, but will do nicely for portraits (indoors and out), and is a full 1:1 macro lens.

  5. #15
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    12

    Re: Canon DSLR for beginners... help pls :(



    i hate using flash, it makes things look bad ...


    Quote Originally Posted by neuroanatomist
    You might consider the EF-S 60mm f/2.8 Macro

    and thats one more lens option now


    Quote Originally Posted by neuroanatomist
    unless you have pretty big rooms.

    how big exactly?



  6. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,298

    Re: Canon DSLR for beginners... help pls :(



    Quote Originally Posted by Bujji
    now im thinking about buying a 1000D and investing in lens

    Quote Originally Posted by Bujji


    i like to shoot tiny things ( the macro mode on my powershot has been very satisfying ), portraits n landscape.


    Good choice I think. If I may say, I think the 18-55 you get with the camera is definitely not the idea of putting money into glass.


    An 85 1.8 or the 60mm macro would be great, although it would be your only good lens. And it will limit you in some ways.


    I personally would have chosen for a better quality general lens. And safe money to buy more specific lenses like a macro or a 1.8 lens later on.


    My advice is to really take a look at the Tamron 17-50 f2.8. It offers you very high image quality for a low price and it will give you a great general purpose lens. The f2.8 constant aperture can be well used for portraiture and also indoors, although there will be occasions when you'd need a flash, but that's something you can't get away from. With a f1.8 lens you might have more low-light capabilities albeit at the cost of depth of field, which might be required also. It also means you'd need a faster shutterspeed to handhold it which is also a negative point for inside/low-light photography with it. So even with a f1.8 lens there will be occasions when you need a flash indoors.


    If you would choose to buy a better general-purpose lens like the Tamron, I would advice you not to buy the 18-55 with the kit. Just buy the 1000D body.


    Quote Originally Posted by Bujji
    2. and can i use a 85mm f/1.8 for portraits indoors?

    Yes you can, but at the cost of depth of field (which can be good, but can also work against you) and the need of a fast shutterspeed


    Quote Originally Posted by Bujji
    i like to shoot tiny things ( the macro mode on my powershot has been very satisfying )

    I'm also a huge macro-fan, although I wouldn't advice you to base your gear on it. I personally think a solid base (read: general purpose-lens) is more important.


    Good luck with your decision!


    Jan

  7. #17
    Senior Member neuroanatomist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    3,716

    Re: Canon DSLR for beginners... help pls :(



    Quote Originally Posted by Bujji
    i hate using flash, it makes things look bad ...

    It doesn't have to...but that's one more accessory to buy. The reason the flash on your PowerShot 'makes things look bad' is because it's right next to the lens. Same will be true of the onboard pop-up flash on a dSLR. That results in harsh, unflattering light (and often red-eye, too). The solution is an external flash (in the hotshoe mount), which you can bounce off the ceiling for more flattering lighting. Here are two images from Bryan's review of the 430EX II - built-in flash on the left, bounced 430EX II on the right. See the difference?





    Quote Originally Posted by Bujji


    Quote Originally Posted by neuroanatomist
    unless you have pretty big rooms.

    how big exactly?


    Well, an 85mm lens on a 1.6x crop body at a subject distance of 8 feet will frame about 1.5x2 feet - that's a head/shoulders shot. To take a full-body portrait with an 85mm lens on a crop body (in portrait orientation), for a 6-foot tall subject you'd need to be ~23 feet away.

  8. #18
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    12

    Re: Canon DSLR for beginners... help pls :(



    jus a thought... how abt the 18-200mm and 50mm f/1.8


    does it cover my needs?


    1.8 for indoor and 18-200 for general purpose...


    will it be a good choice?

  9. #19
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    14

    Re: Canon DSLR for beginners... help pls :(



    The 50 1.8, as the others have said, will be great for low light shots and portrait shots. With the 18-200 though, you're looking at a variable aperture ranging from f/3.5-5.6, very similar to what the kit lens 18-55mm does. It really depends what you'd be using it for. For outdoor/landscape/scenery type use, it would work as you wouldn't need to worry about lower aperture. If you wanted to do any low-light shots, or portraits with it however, that's where you'll find the issues. But, as an entry level lens for a 'cover all', it wouldn't be too bad.


    Also, welcome to the forums!


    Zach

  10. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,298

    Re: Canon DSLR for beginners... help pls :(



    Quote Originally Posted by Bujji


    1.8 for indoor and 18-200 for general purpose...


    will it be a good choice?


    The 50mm 1.8 is never bad


    About the 18-200, well it has less image quality than the Tamron 17-50, but it does have more range(on the long end). It's up to you what would be a good choice for you.


    Range vs Quality

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •