Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 44

Thread: Canon DSLR for beginners... help pls :(

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    12

    Canon DSLR for beginners... help pls :(



    Unlike most of u ppl here im not an experienced photographer [:'(]... im gonna buy my first DSLR camera and my friend suggested that i choose 1000D(though my initial choice was 550D, i decided to listen to my friend coz he is more experienced)... all these days i've been using only a canon powershot, so i dont have any idea abt wat a SLR cam is capable of...


    can anyone of u give me some tips on how to handle the cam plsssssssss and am i making a right choice by selecting a 1000D over 550D ?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,298

    Re: Canon DSLR for beginners... help pls :(



    Quote Originally Posted by Bujji
    Unlike most of u ppl here im not an experienced photographer [:'(]

    Everybody was a beginner once...


    First off: the camera.


    To be honest the 1000D is a good camera, but I wouldn't recommend it over a 550D. To be honest I think the 1000D is too limited in it's capabilities. It's a real starters-camera. I would go for either the 550D, the 500D or even the 450D. All better than the 1000D, and all with different pro's. For instance the 500D/550D offer video, the 450D doesn't. I only have experience with the 450D so someone else must tell you some more about these camera's.


    Second: you need to practice a lot! If you have the chance, buy a book for DSLR or ask your friend. The most important things to understand are aperture, shutterspeed, ISO and how they act together. If you understand that you know the basics and you'll discover much more in a rapid rate.


    Also an important glass in DSLR is: glass before body. Good glass(lenses) makes more impact to a photo in terms of quality than a good camera-body does.


    Anyway good luck with it and feel free to ask anything!


    I'm sure people here want to help you with any question you have!


    Welcome!


    -Jan

  3. #3

    Re: Canon DSLR for beginners... help pls :(



    Hi Bujji, welcome to TPD!


    Like Jan suggested, if you have to money to spend, get the 550. There are a lot of features that justify the extra costs (ISO, display, metering). There are a lot of extra advanced features, which you wouldn't use right away, but when your getting the hang of photography, you will be glad you spend the extra bucks.


    Check out this site for a complete spec comparison.


    Joël

  4. #4
    Senior Member thekingb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    512

    Re: Canon DSLR for beginners... help pls :(



    Hi Bujji,


    I started with a 1000D, quickly got serious about photography, and quickly outgrew it.


    But here's the deal: do you see yourself really learning photography? Getting a better lens and learning to control your aperture, shutter and ISO? (BTW, it's super fun when you do!) If so, I would start with the 550D. If not, and you think you will use the camera on its fully automatic settings, the only real reason to get the 550D would be for video. But frankly, doing video on D-SLRs is a different experience, and controlling camera shake and keeping focus are much more difficult than with a traditional camcorder.


    Learning photography is fun and satisfying, and I also totally agree that getting high quality lenses first is the best way to learn photography. My first new lens was the EF 50mm f/1.4, which opened up a whole new world of low light pictures w/o a flash and super-sharp outdoor portraits -- neither of which were really possible with the kit lens on the 1000D and 550D. With f/1.4 capability, I had the opportunity to learn how to match the aperture settings to the situation I was trying to photograph -- and more. For example, shooting in low light indoors (use wide aperture) produces white balance issues, which helped me learn how to correct them in post-processing and, better yet, use a white balance card to make that process even easier. And so on, and so on.


    So if you want to learn and make incredible pictures, start with a 550D, get some books, and take your time experimenting. But if you want to point and shoot but still, in many cases, outperform the compact point and shoots out there, go for the XS.


    Best,


    Brian

  5. #5

    Re: Canon DSLR for beginners... help pls :(



    The 1000D is very cheap right now and the 550D costs almost twice as much. So you would choose 1000D because of price but you'll soon notice the body's price is but a small part of the formula. The price of extra batteries, memory cards, flash and obviously lens will dwarf the price of the body. Like me, after you have spent more than $3000 on lens and accessories, do you want to put them on the 1000D instead of the 550D?


    If you don't plan on buying new lens, then the 1000D will be a good P&S replacement. And if you get the 1000D used, you probably won't lose much reselling it later.



  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    10

    Re: Canon DSLR for beginners... help pls :(



    Bujji,


    Welcome! I am really new to digital photography as well and while I definitely don't have the experience that the others do, I hope that I can help little. If I were chosing between the 1000D and the 550D I would chose the 550D. You really get more bang for your buck.I can't speak from experince becauseI have the 450D but I really love it. I want to step up to the 7D but like you have already heard, I am getting better glass before I make the jump. On that note, I would also recommend not getting the package deals. I got a kit dealthat came with 2 lensesand while the lenses were OK from what I have already learned I probably would have been better off buying just the body and getting the lens seperate. I started with the 18-55mm IS and it was adequate, until I made the jump to the 17-55MM IS/USM and now I see that there is a huge difference. As far as experience, I have read a couple of books (and asked a lot of questions here) but that only really teaches the basics. What I am finding out now is that the best way to learn is to take lots of pictures. Take one scene or shot that you like and try it a bunch of different ways. Use different shutter speeds, different aperatures and see what changes each time. This way you can practice framing your shot and see what effect each change has so that you will know what setting to change and how to change it when you need to. That is just my advice, hope it helps some.


    Good Luck,


    Matt

  7. #7

    Re: Canon DSLR for beginners... help pls :(



    Matt,


    Honestly, I don't agree on the kit lens part. Don't get those package which include two or three lenses, but the standard Canon 18-55 is just fine. Learning the limitations of certain lens - is in my opinion - essential before moving on and getting better glass. I only recommend this route if you've had earlier experience in photography.


    Joël

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ottawa, ON
    Posts
    1,309

    Re: Canon DSLR for beginners... help pls :(



    And I'll somewhat agree with the kit lens part.


    Yes, ignore the 2-3 lens kits, as the telephoto lenses included are typically awful.


    The 1000D (Rebel XS) often is sold with the 18-55 without IS. Avoid this lens.


    The 1000D and 550D (Rebel T2i) can be found with the 18-55 IS. This is actually quite a decent lens. The IS has automatic mode 2 (panning) detecting. Optically it's quite decent. The big disadvantage of this lens is the variable f stop. At the long end it's f/5.6, meaning you won't get a nice blurry background on your portraits.


    Typically the IS lens kit is $100 over the camera alone. For a few hundred more you can get the camera body only, and a Tamron 17-50 f/2.8. It has no IS, but it has a constant f/2.8 aperture, allowing for thinner depth of field (DOF), which is how you get those nice blurry backgrounds. If you can't afford the Tamron lens, then by all means, pick up the IS kit lens.


    If you opt for the kit lens, see if you can find the $100 for a 50mm f/1.8 too. You'll see what a low f value can do for you in terms of low-light shooting and thin depth of field. You'll get a feel for a prime (non-zooming) lens, so you'll know if you're the type that loves them or hates them. The image quality per dollar, and educational value of the 50mm f/1.8 can't be beat.
    On Flickr - Namethatnobodyelsetook on Flickr | On the web - http://www.GrassStainedPhoto.com
    1DsII | 7D | 7DII | 10-18mm STM | 18-135mm STM | 24-70mm f/4L | Sigma 35mm f/1.4 | 50mm f/1.8 | 85mm f/1.8 | 70-300mm f/4-5.6L

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    12

    Re: Canon DSLR for beginners... help pls :(



    thank you sooooooooooooooooo much guys


    i'll be getting my cam in 3 or 4 days time... and from wat u ppl have suggested i've decided to go for a 550D .


    but then here is my situation, if i get a 550D i cant ask my dad for a lens (coz i feel bad askin him for money) atleast for the next 2 yrs , ie till i complete college. 2 yrs is a really long time and im pretty sure both 1000D n 550D will be outdated by then. so here are my options


    1. 1000D(comes with an 18-55) + EF 50mm f/1.4


    2. 550D (with an 18-55)


    both these options cost the same, but about the other paramaters im totally clueless, if i go by lens then option one seems good, coz if 550D becomes outdated in two yrs, ther is no point in buying a new lens ( correct me if im wrong).


    arrrrrghhhhhhhh im so confused again



  10. #10
    Senior Member neuroanatomist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    3,716

    Re: Canon DSLR for beginners... help pls :(



    Honestly, either the 1000D or the 550D will be a big, big step up from a PowerShot. You're correct in that camera bodies become outdated relatively quickly - but that's outdated only in the sense that a new one with more/different/'better' features comes out. If you're happy with the pictures from your camera, there's no need to upgrade to the newest body. Lenses are different - a good lens will last through several bodies, for those who tend to upgrade.


    Either body will allow you to learn the basics of exposure (aperture, shutter speed, and ISO settings).


    I'd definitely encourage you to get both a zoom and a fast prime lens (the 50mm f/1.4 is very nice, and will give you a taste of better lenses; however, the 'nifty-fifty' 50mm f/1.8 is a good value, too, and cheap).


    How sure are you that photography is going to be your thing? If you just want to 'try it out' with a dSLR, then the 1000D + 18-55mm kit lens + 50mm f/1.8 is the least expensive option. You'll still be able to get some great pictures and learn a lot in the process. If you decide to make it a dedicated hobby or more, you can increase your investment later.


    Just as a side note if you go with option 1 above, and sorry for adding another variable, but instead of the 50mm f/1.4, you might consider the 85mm f/1.8. It's also a fast prime with great image quality, and that way you'd also have a longer lens in than your 18-55mm for around the same cost as the 50mm f/1.4.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •