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Thread: Camera on a cruise: Dealing with humidity, temperature changes?

  1. #1

    Camera on a cruise: Dealing with humidity, temperature changes?



    This last week, I had the good fortunate to be on a cruise ship in the Caribbean. Unfortunately, my Canon XSi, 17-55, 50 1.8, and 28-135 aren't weather-sealed (would that make a difference for this?).


    Every time I went from inside (about 68 degrees, 50% humidity) to outside (90-100 degrees, 90-100% humidity), the camera and lenses fogged up due to condensation. I tried wiping fronts and backs of lenses, the mirror in the camera, etc., to remove the moisture, but no luck. It seems that the different elements in each lens were all hosed.


    Suggestions on best methods to eliminate the condensation? Slowly bring up to new temperature by keeping in bag/wrapped in towel/cloth?


    This was probably the most frustrating aspect of the trip, as I missed lots of great shots dealing with this issue. I even woke up super-early to see us pull into Jacksonville, FL, the final morning, but the camera and lenses didn't cooperate. :-(


    Thanks for any advice or field experience tips!


    RanD-MC



  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    388

    Re: Camera on a cruise: Dealing with humidity, temperature changes?



    Try large Ziplock baggies. Keep the camera and spare lenses sealed for about 20 minutes when going from air conditioned environments to the outside humidity. That should do the trick.

  3. #3

    Re: Camera on a cruise: Dealing with humidity, temperature changes?



    I try to keep all my gear in my backpack and let it warm up when I go outside, but when I forget and walk out with my camera in hand the only real thing I can do is let themoistureevaporate byitself. Any attempt to wipe it off just makes it worse.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    Jan 2009
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    Re: Camera on a cruise: Dealing with humidity, temperature changes?



    Yes let it easily achieve the same temperature and moisture levels in your bag.


    It's the same as shooting in wintertimes. Shoot a lot when it's freezing, put the stuff in your bag before entering the house and leave it for like 30m at least so it easily adjusts to the environment and you'll be fine. It just takes time. You can also use a hair-blower to warm up your lens and camera a bit before going outside, that will also work.


    Btw weathersealed lenses and camera's also suffer from condensation, so they would have done exactly the same thing.


    Jan

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