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Thread: Not sure Im happy with my 70-200mm is mkii

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    Not sure Im happy with my 70-200mm is mkii









    Can you look at the Rhino picture as Im getting quite a few shots like this.

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    Re: Not sure Im happy with my 70-200mm is mkii



    like what? looks fine for me

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    Re: Not sure Im happy with my 70-200mm is mkii



    Quote Originally Posted by peterborough_photography
    Can you look at the Rhino picture as Im getting quite a few shots like this.

    They look good to me. What is it about the photos that don't make you happy?

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    Senior Member Dave Johnston's Avatar
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    Re: Not sure Im happy with my 70-200mm is mkii



    Hmmm... They do seem a little too awesome to me...[:P]


    On a more serious note though... What is it that you find wrong here? [^o)]


    5D mark III, 50D, 17-40 f4L, 24-70 f2.8L, 70-200 f4L ​IS, 28 f1.8, 50 f1.8, 85 f1.8, 100 f2.8 Macro

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    Re: Not sure Im happy with my 70-200mm is mkii



    Peter...,


    Could you tell us a little more about these shots, like:


    What camera body?


    Metadata?


    Time of day; mid-afternoon?


    Jpeg or RAW format, Post Processing?





    Although, I do like the composition of the photos, I do think that the backgrounds in the first 2 photos are a bit blown out (which I don't have much of a problem with), and all 3 photos lack a certain amount of "Pop" and look a little flat to me with decreased color saturation.


    I would think that just a little bit of PP; like contrast and perhaps a touch of saturation would make these photos pop.


    Is this particular 70-200mm focal range putting you in less than optimal photo situations regarding the time of day, with overblown blue mid-day light? For example, I have found that I mainly use my 70-200mm and 300mm for sports or events in the afternoon, where the time of day and outdoor lighting are beyond my control.


    I'm just guessing, but if that's the case, perhaps a polarizing filter would help?


    I would like to reassure you, that the 70-200mm/f2.8L IS II is a great lens and I wouldn't give up on it!





    Rich



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    Senior Member neuroanatomist's Avatar
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    Re: Not sure Im happy with my 70-200mm is mkii



    I'll echo the questions above - in addition to knowing what you don't like about the shots, it would be helpful to knows some shot details, e.g. what aperture was used. If your concern is focus/sharpness, it would also be important to know where you intended to focus, and whether you used an AF point over that spot or used focus/recompose.


    Personally, I've been very happy with myEF 70-200mm f/2.8<span style="color: red;"]LIS II USM. FWIW, I did apply a +2 AF microadjustment.

  7. #7

    Re: Not sure Im happy with my 70-200mm is mkii



    Hi!





    The pictures are awesome! NG-like.





    I see, your marketing skills are great as well.





    Alex.

  8. #8

    Re: Not sure Im happy with my 70-200mm is mkii



    All the photos taken were hand held.


    Most shot at 200mm, using a Eos 50d.


    The rhino picture was shot f3.5, 1/640s at iso 100 hand held.


    I dont like the area at the bottom of the picture which is going out of focus, I have tried 3 of these lenses and they all do the same. Although not on every shot.


    I dont like messing about in photoshop to much, only when I do weddings and commercial stuff. For my own photos I want to shoot the scene as the camera captures it. All files shot in Raw with no change to the orginal file apart from a change to JPEG.


    Focus was centre, with auto white balance, shot in AV mode.


    Im not sure now if this is more to do with the 50d focus zones than the lens ?



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    Re: Not sure Im happy with my 70-200mm is mkii



    Quote Originally Posted by peterborough_photography


    All the photos taken were hand held.


    Most shot at 200mm, using a Eos 50d.


    The rhino picture was shot f3.5, 1/640s at iso 100 hand held.


    I dont like the area at the bottom of the picture which is going out of focus, I have tried 3 of these lenses and they all do the same. Although not on every shot.


    I dont like messing about in photoshop to much, only when I do weddings and commercial stuff. For my own photos I want to shoot the scene as the camera captures it. All files shot in Raw with no change to the orginal file apart from a change to JPEG.


    Focus was centre, with auto white balance, shot in AV mode.


    Im not sure now if this is more to do with the 50d focus zones than the lens ?


    How far were you from the subject?
    Canon 450D Gripped, Canon 24-105 f/4L, Canon 70-200 f/2.8L IS USM II, Sigma 10-20 EX f/4-5.6, Canon S95

    “There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer.” -Ansel Adams

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    Senior Member neuroanatomist's Avatar
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    Re: Not sure Im happy with my 70-200mm is mkii



    Quote Originally Posted by peterborough_photography


    The rhino picture was shot f3.5, 1/640s at iso 100 hand held.


    I dont like the area at the bottom of the picture which is going out of focus, I have tried 3 of these lenses and they all do the same. Although not on every shot.


    The foreground blur results from basic photographic optics - depth of field. Based on 200mm on a 50D and the size of a rhino, I'm guessing you're around 13 meters from them. At 200mm f/3.5 and 13 meters from subject, your DoF is about 0.5 meters. You've probably got 2 meters of grass in the foreground, which is going to be progressively more out of focus further from the subject. Stopping down to f/8 or f/11 will increase your DoF, but even at f/11 your DoF for the distances above would be under 2 meters, meaning you'd still have some foreground blur.


    For many, the ability to blur the foreground and background with a wide aperture, which serves to isolate the subject and add impact to the picture, is one of the big reasons to use a dSLR. Going from a 1.6x crop like your 50D to a FF camera like the 5DII enhances that effect, since the crop factor also applies to aperture as it affects DoF. A point-and-shoot camera, with a much smaller sensor, cannot achieve the thin DoF you get with a dSLR. This is why dSLR landscape shooters use wide angle lenses and very narrow apertures (and tripods for the long exposure times which result from the very narrow apertures). But those long exposures are not so good for wildlife. If you really want to have the whole image in focus, crisp from close foreground to distant background, and still keep a reasonably fast shutter speed, one way to achieve that for this type of shot would be with a P&amp;S camera.


    I suspect most of us were having trouble seeing the 'flaw' in the rhino picture because that sort of subject isolation is a often considered a desirable effect. Imagine your zebra picture if the fence in the background was clearly in focus - personally, I would not want that.

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