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Thread: Shooting Interiors

  1. #1
    Senior Member MrGreenBug's Avatar
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    Shooting Interiors



    I had a chance to shoot some interiors of a great house. Here's my favorite photo that I would like some C&C. I tried to do it for the sake of experience and trying learn something new.


    Well aside from lack of DOF, I hope other insights on this.


    1000D + kit lens @ 25mm, f/11, 3.2 secs, ISO 200





    Thank you for viewing.
    Cheers!
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    AnGelo Chiu (MrGreenBug in Flickr), Blog: http://mrgreenbug.blogspot.com

  2. #2
    Senior Member neuroanatomist's Avatar
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    Re: Shooting Interiors



    Nice composition! Since you were the only one of us who was actually there, you'd have the best insight into the colors and whether or not they are accurate (if accuracy is a goal). The white balance looks a tad warm to me, though. Canon's Auto WB doesn't always to the best job with tungsten lighting - I find it helpful to shoot RAW and then correct in post. You can adjust color temperature until you get the WB you want, or include a WB reference in one shot and then pick up a click white balance during RAW processing (I use a Datacolor SpyderCube or anX-Rite ColorChecker Passport for that).


    --John

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    Re: Shooting Interiors



    Nice shot. A custom white balance might have been an improvement. Also would have liked to see the room from a wider perspective but since I wasn't there maybe there were things that would have taken away from the shot. All in all I like it.


    Tom

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    Re: Shooting Interiors



    The Clock is crooked. [] Only Kidding!


    Itlooks good to me, but I agree with the white balance adjustment, as it looks a tad on the warm side.


    Rich

  5. #5
    Senior Member MrGreenBug's Avatar
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    Re: Shooting Interiors



    Thank you for the boost of confidence John, Tom, and Rich!


    I shot this in RAW and adjusted the WB as it was really 'warm' compared to this one. Lemme give it another look tonight and adjust more the WB to a 'cooler' light.


    I guess the tricky part was having tungsten as main light, cloudy daylight on right (it had floor to ceiling window walls), and some patches of fluorescent light.


    Thank you again for your comments.


    Again, I've learned something new form you guys.. about the custom WB. I should have tried using it. I guess I was too busy on composition, exposure, or most probably just lack of experience.


    Here's the 'cooled' photo (I think this is better):


    Cheers!
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    AnGelo Chiu (MrGreenBug in Flickr), Blog: http://mrgreenbug.blogspot.com

  6. #6
    Senior Member neuroanatomist's Avatar
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    Re: Shooting Interiors



    Quote Originally Posted by MrGreenBug
    I guess the tricky part was having tungsten as main light, cloudy daylight on right (it had floor to ceiling window walls), and some patches of fluorescent light.

    That's definitely a tricky lighting situation. The only thing you're missing is some fill flash, to throw yet another color temperature into the mix... [:P]


    That's exactly the sort of situation where I'd throw a WB reference into a test shot for later.


    Quote Originally Posted by MrGreenBug
    Here's the 'cooled' photo (I think this is better):

    I like it better, too. I'm a big fan of getting the WB right, that was one of the main reasons I switch to RAW - so I could adjust WB in post without penalty.


    You can certainly do a custom WB on site, but if you're shooting in RAW, IMO it's easier to just do it in post. I think the only times I'd set an in-camera custom WB would be if I was going to shoot jpgs indoors - but I don't ever shoot JPG (even my P&S - an S95 - shoots in RAW). Else, I just find it easier to tweak in post.

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    Re: Shooting Interiors



    Excellent fix. If we all remain open minded to each others comments we all improve as photographers. I think that is what this forum is about, or at least should be. But since we are a bunch of egotists it can be difficult at times. Lol!!


    Tom

  8. #8
    Senior Member MrGreenBug's Avatar
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    Re: Shooting Interiors



    Quote Originally Posted by neuroanatomist
    <div>


    I like it better, too. I'm a big fan of getting the WB right, that was one of the main reasons I switch to RAW - so I could adjust WB in post without penalty.

    <div>I try to achieve this too (at least most of the time) and that's why I shoot in RAW 99% of the time. [] I really don't have any experience on in-camera custom white balance.</div>
    <div></div>
    <div>
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Wertman
    </div>
    <div>


    Excellent fix. If we all remain open minded to each others comments we all improve as photographers. I think that is what this forum is about, or at least should be. But since we are a bunch of egotists it can be difficult at times. Lol!!


    Tom
    </div>
    </div>


    Thanks Tom. I do like the fix better. And yeah, sometimes our egos get in the way of improvement. []
    Cheers!
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    AnGelo Chiu (MrGreenBug in Flickr), Blog: http://mrgreenbug.blogspot.com

  9. #9
    Senior Member thekingb's Avatar
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    Re: Shooting Interiors



    I like the shot, especially after the WB tweak. The only question I have is about the framing. While I am sure the shot was tight and it sounds like the windows created a real challenge, I feel like the left side of the frame (the sink in particular) is clipped -- kind of like a portrait that cuts off a person's arm at the elbow. Would it have been possible to zoom out a little to include more of the sink and its undercabinet? I understand why you wanted to keep the doorway in the shot, as it provides some nice depth to the shot.

  10. #10
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    Re: Shooting Interiors



    Nice shot Angelo, the second is definitely better toned than the first one [Y] I like the angle and the field of view. However I think the window on the right isn't adding much to the picture if I must be honest. Personally I think I would have removed it by cropping. But nonetheless it's a very nice shot.


    I like to do the white-balance just as John does. Correct it in post-processing. I just bought a grey card set which I'm planning on using in some more serious photos. Just make sure it's in the frame at one shot and keep shooting auto-white-balance. And then adjust all the photos in the same lighting in post-processing with the sample image I shot of the grey card.


    Quote Originally Posted by MrGreenBug
    sometimes our egos get in the way of improvement. [img]/emoticons/emotion-2.gif[/img]

    Haha +1, also my stubbornness isn't really helping out from time to time [:P] If I think I'm right...try to stop me [] But yeah if you/me/we keep respecting and valuing eachothers opinions, we could all improve a lot.


    Jan

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