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Thread: sRGB or AdobeRGB?

  1. #1
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    sRGB or AdobeRGB?



    A client of mine who is an avid amateur photographer (Nikon D300, 80-400, 600 f/4 with trick gimbal mount, Gitzo carbon tripod, etc.) told me that he thought I should be capturing in AdobeRGB. I had originally been using the camera in sRGB. He said that most pro photogs and pro printing shops use AdobeRGB, and I should capture in that format.


    I guess the second question is that if I want to use Canon DPP to tweak my own shots, which format does it need, or can it use either?


    Side note: I don't know why, but I haven't opened the software package for my 40D. Maybe if I sell it to get the camera of my dreams I want to have the box and contents as pristine as possible. Silly, I guess. I figured I would be able to get DPP online. Unfortunately, it seems that all I've found so far on Canon's site seems to be updates to DPP, which means to me that I need to already have the original installed. Am I just not seeing it correctly?

  2. #2
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    Re: sRGB or AdobeRGB?



    http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/adobe-rgb.htm


    I use sRGB based on this article. And I have found that setting my screen to sRGB makes prints almost identical to my screen.

  3. #3
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    Re: sRGB or AdobeRGB?



    I read somewhere that Adobe RGB is better, but the truth of the matter is I can't see any difference.


    Open an image in Photoshop>Edit>Convert Profile (choose the other profile). Convert it, then open History palette, click back and forth on the processes in there. I don't think you will see it change. So If you use a printer that prefers on or the other use that one to make them happy.


    Make sure Photoshops Default color space is the same so you get predictable output. Never let it change color profiles when opening. You want to be able to watch it happen to see if colors shift.

  4. #4
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    Re: sRGB or AdobeRGB?



    Most displays are tuned for sRGB and can't display AdobeRGB colors very well. Other displays, which are specifically for photography, can show AdobeRGB but can't show sRGB very well.


    Printers can show more of AdobeRGB. Many colors that are impossible in sRGB become possible in AdobeRGB. Most of the time, with most images, even with a high quality printer, the difference is subtle or none at all.


    And, of course, the setting only applies to in-camera JPEG. I suggest that you shoot RAW instead, then use ProPhoto RGB, which is wider than either sRGB *or* AdobeRGB. It would be bad to use at 8-bit, but at 16-bit it is excellent. It will be possible to print more colors than even Adobe RGB.

  5. #5
    Alan
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    Re: sRGB or AdobeRGB?



    If you're taking RAW images, it matters not what color space you're using to capture the image.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Jayson's Avatar
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    Re: sRGB or AdobeRGB?



    I found a good article on this topic when I was asking the same question.


    http://luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/prophoto-rgb.shtml


    It helped me to understand.

  7. #7

    Re: sRGB or AdobeRGB?



    That's a very good and accurate explanation. Glad you found that link so I don't have to go through all the work of explaining it. I have been in the printing industry for 22 years and I work with color management and image color workflows every day.


    The bottom line is...


    If you don't understand color management and you get your prints made at Walmart, Cosco, Walgreens etc... you might want to stick with SRGB and keep doing what you've always done. If you take the time to learn color management and want to print your images on an inkjet printer so you can sell them, ProPhoto is the way to go.


    If you use SRGB, you will be clipping lots of colors out of your photograph that your printer and or your high end print service can print. The other article mentioned in a previous post that explains that you should just shoot in SRGB/.jpg and leave everything alone is not correct. Again, if you don't understand color management, it may be the way to go. If you want the absolute best color match from your monitor to your printer, get the most color available to you from your camera, and create the best prints possible, shoot in RAW and use ProPhoto RGB.


    If you are using SRGB and getting your prints from Cosco, Walgreens, Walmart ect... and are happy with the results, then stick with it.


    If you are going to be printing your images on an inkjet printer like professionals that sell their prints, you should use ProPhoto RGB to get the most color you can.



  8. #8
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    Re: sRGB or AdobeRGB?



    Quote Originally Posted by steve_m


    That's a very good and accurate explanation. Glad you found that link so I don't have to go through all the work of explaining it. I have been in the printing industry for 22 years and I work with color management and image color workflows every day.


    The bottom line is...


    If you don't understand color management and you get your prints made at Walmart, Cosco, Walgreens etc... you might want to stick with SRGB and keep doing what you've always done. If you take the time to learn color management and want to print your images on an inkjet printer so you can sell them, ProPhoto is the way to go.


    If you use SRGB, you will be clipping lots of colors out of your photograph that your printer and or your high end print service can print. The other article mentioned in a previous post that explains that you should just shoot in SRGB/.jpg and leave everything alone is not correct. Again, if you don't understand color management, it may be the way to go. If you want the absolute best color match from your monitor to your printer, get the most color available to you from your camera, and create the best prints possible, shoot in RAW and use ProPhoto RGB.


    If you are using SRGB and getting your prints from Cosco, Walgreens, Walmart ect... and are happy with the results, then stick with it.


    If you are going to be printing your images on an inkjet printer like professionals that sell their prints, you should use ProPhoto RGB to get the most color you can.


    I didn't realize that this doesn't apply to RAW images. I shoot RAW+L JPEG, soI guess I can do whatever I want to them (RAW) during processing?


    Where do I get ProPhoto RGB, and is it something I will need in addition to, or as a replacement for, Canon DPP?


    P.S. Thank you, Jayson, for the link to the article. I enjoyed reading it. With the upcoming LED backlit LCD monitors, I think we'll see displays that can allow us to work in a larger gamut and not break the bank.

  9. #9
    Alan
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    Re: sRGB or AdobeRGB?



    Quote Originally Posted by HiFiGuy1


    I didn't realize that this doesn't apply to RAW images. I shoot RAW+L JPEG, soI guess I can do whatever I want to them (RAW) during processing?
    <div style="clear: both;"]</div>


    Correct. Your jpg will have the color space applied to it, however. sRGB is more suitable for prints, and tend to give more vivid colors.

  10. #10
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    Re: sRGB or AdobeRGB?



    So for posting to PhotoBucket and similar activities, I'd be better off with sRGB? It sounds like they'll present better unmodified. I don't manipulate images much if at all in JPEG. I don't intend to print and frame stuff from my JPEGs anyway. I'd do the necessary cleanup in DPP or PhotoShop.


    Also, I understand that PhotoPro RGB is a colorspace, like sRGB or AdobeRGB. Therefore, I don't need to buy a software package called that, but DPP or PhotoShop will have that as a colorspace option. Is that a correct statement?

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