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Thread: Canon ST-E3-RT Vs Youngno YN-E3-RT

  1. #1
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    Lightbulb Canon ST-E3-RT Vs Youngno YN-E3-RT

    I was checking Canon Speedlite Transmitter ST-E3-RT and found out the substitute, Youngno YN-E3-RT also does the same for $ 142 (Canon is $ 279)

    Read few reviews and found out the things I have to accept for $142 are;

    The brand name difference
    Made in China vs Made in Japan
    Build quality (look and feel of the device, buttons, wheel, etc)
    Kind of lose hot shoe fitting

    Other than these, reviews says it does the same (or more) when compared canon transmitter. However, I would like to get you "experts" opinion about your experience, specially in YN-E3-RT. I am sure we have many folks who use either one of these transmitters or both or have experience in both.


    Appreciate your kind comments. Thanks!

  2. #2
    Administrator Sean Setters's Avatar
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    I've purchased a YongNuo flash several years ago and it stopped working properly only after a few months. That said, I've heard their quality has gotten much better since then.

    If you really want to save the money and get the YongNuo version, I'd suggest purchasing from an Amazon seller with a generous return policy (just in case). Otherwise, the Canon version is the gold standard and comes with a pretty good warranty.

  3. #3
    WUCV has probably gone ahead and made a purchase - but I'll leave this comment as a warning/recommendation for other potential buyers.

    I had a similar experience to Sean - I got a YN-565EX back when they first came out. I was tempted by the low prince - needed a more powerful flash and everyone raved about them. It worked quite well for exactly one year. Then one day when doing a paying gig - it stopped working. Luckily - I had my good old 420EX with me. It saved the day. It turns out the Yongnuo just plain old decides to work one day, and not to another. I would never have found out except after I threw it in the closet in disgust I accidentally grabbed it when I went out on a shoot - and was shocked to see my mistake. For some reason it worked, and stopped again a few days later.

    I've since gotten 2 600EX-RT's. Couldn't be happier. That said - Yongnuo's physical build is excellent, and nearly identical to Canon (hence my grabbing the wrong flash!).

    And, I myself have purchased a YN-E3-RT. Call me nuts, but there's a little bit less going on as far as electronics than a flash - and I really liked the idea of having the AF assist and firmware updates. The AF assist is really something that Canon needs to add. I've had it since December, and it has worked flawlessly.

    You really have to consider it as a gamble. Although Yongnuo is supposed to have improved, they have absolutely no consumer support infrastructure in place. If your product dies - even if it's one with a warranty (and many of their products have none!) return to your seller (follow Sean's advice!) or if it's too late, send off to China and wait for a couple of months to see what they do. $150 is really nothing to sneeze at, and for a little more you can have the Canon. Or, look for the times when it's being bundled with a 600EX or two, and grab it. So far I'm happy, but I haven't hit that magic 12 month mark! The build is nearly identical to Canon, and of course the menu functions are exactly the same. I'm one of 2 reviews on Amazon, so you can see my thoughts as I sat with the Canon and did a side-by-side comparison.

    P.S., after 8 or more years, the little 420EX still works fine!

  4. #4
    Junior Member kingscurate's Avatar
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    Ive just read a book on speedlites, and the author reckons to forget using a wireless transmitter and get a off camera extra long cable thingy, his reasoning made sense and saved money to purchase another flashgun etc
    I aint a pro

  5. #5
    Senior Member neuroanatomist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingscurate View Post
    Ive just read a book on speedlites, and the author reckons to forget using a wireless transmitter and get a off camera extra long cable thingy, his reasoning made sense and saved money to purchase another flashgun etc
    Maybe for one flash, or a water drop setup. With 3-4 or more flashes, that's a splitter box and a bunch of cables, trip hazards, means going to each flash to adjust power, etc. IMO, the RT system is *really* convenient in a multi-flash setup.

  6. #6
    Junior Member kingscurate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by neuroanatomist View Post
    Maybe for one flash, or a water drop setup. With 3-4 or more flashes, that's a splitter box and a bunch of cables, trip hazards, means going to each flash to adjust power, etc. IMO, the RT system is *really* convenient in a multi-flash setup.
    Cant argue with that, one thing to consider just going off the little info the OP provided is the transmitter has less than half the functionality of a 580 EX etc, so consider another flashgun to use as master.
    I aint a pro

  7. #7
    Senior Member clemmb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingscurate View Post
    Ive just read a book on speedlites, and the author reckons to forget using a wireless transmitter and get a off camera extra long cable thingy, his reasoning made sense and saved money to purchase another flashgun etc
    Bound By Technology by F. Marcus C, on Flickr
    Mark

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by kingscurate View Post
    Cant argue with that, one thing to consider just going off the little info the OP provided is the transmitter has less than half the functionality of a 580 EX etc, so consider another flashgun to use as master.
    Sounds like you've read Syl's book "Speedliter's Handbook". If not, I'd put that near the top of the list for your next read. Although - perhaps 20% of it refers to technology that's been surpassed - even some of the light modifiers are a bit long in the tooth! I think we need to see "Sean Setter: Speedlite Specialist" at Amazon soon.

    An inexpensive set of triggers IMVHO is a must for anybody wanting to play with light. In fact, there's a greater deal of flexibility with triggers than there is with the Canon RT system. The huge advantage of the RT system is of course that you don't have to hook a trigger up to every speedlite you've got, plus Canon's overwhelmingly accurate TTL system.

    While some of the first "eBay" triggers were complete junk, they've come a long ways and compete with Pocket Wizard and Radio Popper on nearly every level. I've found that using a cheap trigger system (non TTL) has 2 big advantages. 1) it teaches you (or forces) to use your flashes manually. When it starts to get to an intuitive level, you know you've learned something! 2) you can trigger your camera remotely as well - so basically not only are the flashes off camera, you are too!

    One of the things I do is shoot Real Estate, and for those dramatic evening shots I walk around with a flash and "paint" a house with light (handheld speedlite) while triggering the camera. Then I brush it together in Photoshop Layers. Loads of fun. Being able to trigger your camera and flash remotely is a huge plus in my book.

    In a studio setting however, a cable going to your strobes makes all kinds of sense to save money. Chances are you've got cable running everywhere anyway, so what's one more? However - the chances are also good that you can use your line of site optical trigger (newer EOS cameras) to do that work. In fact, I purchased a little 90EX for my 6D just so I could trigger a flash this way. I figure for $45 at the time, it's a flash I can carry in my pocket, or use to trigger pretty much any flash with slave mode - An old 420EX or a Yongnuo (if it works!).

    Off the topic a bit - but when the 600EX-RT was first released, I purchased a 600EX (non RT). It was only $380. But after anguishing I returned it for an RT. I doubted my decision for a long time. I had anticipated many products coming out afterwards - from RT triggers from Canon to third party flashes and controllers all using that technology. Sadly, Canon has left it languishing - and Yongnuo finally came out with a controller, but really didn't do much to improve or differentiate themselves with it. I have to admit, I'm a bit disappointed with Canon not coming out with triggers to support the 580EX, or even a 440EX-RT. I hope in the future they rectify this - especially before Nikon ups the ante and comes out on top of the flash wars again. How cool would it be to have the functionality of the ST-E3-RT built into the next generation EOS?

  9. #9
    Senior Member iND's Avatar
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    All I can say is I have 600EX-Rt x 4 and the ST-E3-RT
    and I don't know what more I can ask for.

    Works all the time every time.

    But as I posted in a earlier thread,
    To take advantage of the GROUP function you need a 5DIII or greater body.

    4 flashes may sound like overkill but I sometimes double up on the main light and use one for a background and one for the hair so that equals 4.

    Could not be happier with this set up.

    I find not having the bulk of a 600 EX RT on camera is liberating.

    If you are considering it go for it.

    Can't speak to the YN E3 RT but after the ST E3 RT I never looked back and sold my other collection of triggers and my 580s


    Syl wrote on this combo last year and I hope he updates his book.

    Thanks

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