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Thread: Macro

  1. #1
    Senior Member iND's Avatar
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    Macro

    Since I turn off my IS when using a tripod.

    And if I will be using a tripod for most of my macro work.

    Does it make sense to buy a macro lens with IS, except for handheld work?

    thank you

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Kayaker72's Avatar
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    The 100 mm f/2.8 L IS macro is one of my favorite portrait lenses. Also, I tend to use it for "close up" photography which isn't what I typically think of as macro. In both instances, I find the IS helpful. Granted, I am usually faster than 1/100 sec, but like being able to drop down to 1/60-1/80 sec when needed.

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    If your Macro work include bugs and you like crawling around on the ground to get up close natural shots, yes it makes sense to have the IS.
    While most of your work might be with tripod, the IS would be handy for all those times that may not be part of "most".
    I pre-ordered my 100mm f/2.8 IS and it has always been one of my favorites.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Dave Throgmartin's Avatar
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    Nearly all of my macro has been hand held -- we like to go to local gardens and tripods aren't allowed. I really like the 100L. I rented the non-IS a while back and my recollection is the 100L is built quite a bit better.

    Dave

  5. #5
    Senior Member conropl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Throgmartin View Post
    Nearly all of my macro has been hand held -- we like to go to local gardens and tripods aren't allowed. I really like the 100L. I rented the non-IS a while back and my recollection is the 100L is built quite a bit better.

    Dave
    That sums it up pretty good. Athough I try to get on a tripod as much as possible, there are places that do not allow them. Sometimes you need the freedom of hand holding.

    I also tried out a friend's non IS version and I do like the "L" IS better. One of my favorites and I got a really good price. Really sharp.
    5DS R, 1D X, 7D, Sigma 10-20mm f/4-5.6, 24mm f/1.4L II, 16-35mm f/4L IS, 24-105mm f/4L, 50mm f/1.8, 100mm Macro f/2.8L, 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II, 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L, 580EX-II
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    In terms of IQ the 100 mm L IS is among the top seats for the focal length, other contenders being the Zeiss 100 and Sigma 105. The IS system also makes it a very reasonable portrait lens for those without a wider 85mm or the funds to add a 135, again non-IS, as well. The gain in versatility is what the IS system is about, being able to take it off the tripod to pursue non-macro work with a high quality prime is a gain for many folks.

  7. #7
    Senior Member iND's Avatar
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    To further clarify the question.

    Early IS lenses did not perform well on tripods.
    This included:


    • EF28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM
    • EF75-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM
    • EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM
    • EF300mm f/4L IS USM


    When using certain early models of IS lenses with a tripod it was necessary to turn off the IS function. This is because of a phenomenon known as ‘Shake Return’. Shake Return occurs when the IS system tries to correct vibrations to which the system itself contributes. When the IS lens sits on a tripod, the IS detection gyros pick up any tiny vibrations or movement; these might be caused by the tripod being knocked, or the photographer adjusting a camera setting.
    The IS system then swings into action to correct that movement. The movement of the IS lens group causes its own minute vibration, which is in turn detected by the movement sensor, which triggers another correction. This ‘feedback loop’ can continue endlessly, resulting in the addition of unwanted blur to images that would be sharper if the IS function was switched off.


    Canon addressed the ‘feedback loop’ in later model IS lenses by introducing an algorithm to the IS detection system to automatically recognise when the lens is mounted to a tripod. When these lenses are mounted on a tripod and the shutter button is pressed halfway, the IS system kicks in and the image in the viewfinder can be seen to go through a very slow vertical shift for about one second.
    If the shutter button remains depressed halfway the IS system detects the lack of motion and automatically switches into a special mode. In this mode IS detects and corrects for mirror slap and shutter movement at slow speeds, but not for ‘normal’ lens shake. There is no advantage to be gained in turning off the IS function or locking the mirror prior to exposure.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Jayson's Avatar
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    I have used my 70-200mm f/4L IS on a tripod many times with the IS on and it doesn't mess up the photo. I usually forget to turn it off because I don't notice any problems with the photo. If I do use the 300, you can definitely see an issue so it is a quick reminder to shut off the IS. Regarding you question on the macro, I have the non-L version of the 100mm macro and love it. I use it all the time without a tripod for macro work. I find that being able to move around when chasing things is much more useful than a tripod. I have found ways to keep myself still when I need to. So do you need IS, no. Will it make your life easier...probably. If you are planning on investing in the lens and can afford the extra the IS is worth, then I would get the IS version. They are both built pretty well, but you get weather sealing and IS with the L. I would like it more for the weather sealing since there is a lot of times I am working in wet grass, by water, or when it is snowing.

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    Your new explanation really didn't clarify the original question, it gave most of us information we were already aware of.
    If the question is will the IS hurt your performance on the tripod, the answer is no. Just turn it off, but it looks like you already know the answer there.
    If the question is will the IS help you on the tripod, the answer is no. It is very useful for hand work though.

    If you are only shooting on a tripod my recommendation would be the 180mm f/3.5L macro instead of the 100mm L. Bokeh is much nicer.

  10. #10
    Administrator Sean Setters's Avatar
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    I shoot from a tripod for macro work about 90% of the time. As such, I saved some $$ and got the EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM (refurbished, if I remember correctly). If I had intended on using the lens for other things (like portraiture), the L version would have made a lot of sense. As such, I have other lenses that cover that need so the macro lens gets used for macro purposes only.

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