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Thread: Photographing my working company

  1. #1
    Senior Member jamsus's Avatar
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    Photographing my working company

    Hello everyone,

    i work in a little software development company, and we are surrounded by nature, so sometimes i went out during lunch break to take some pictures.

    My boss asked me if i was able to take some pictures to the company indoor and outdoor for the web site. I don't think that this would be a problem but i would love to ask you if you have some "general" suggestion for doing that, and giving the pictures an "professional" impact.

    I don't have flash\lights to do that, but the indoor is well lighted so i will eventually work on multiple exposures.

    The office is "one big room" with a little reunion glass table and the various desks behind it, and 2\4 walls are made of glass with grey curtains.

    Thank you,

    Andrea

    EDIT:

    this is the indoor of the company



    A : glass table

    B : small desk with 48" black television

    C : desk for systems engineers \ telephone \ secretary

    D : forgotten

    E : Working desks

    F : Tower Server

    The walls are white\bone white and curtains are grey

    I got only a 60D with 18-135 IS STM, 35 mm f2, 50 f1.8 & 100-400 L II no external lights\flash
    Last edited by jamsus; 10-19-2015 at 08:56 AM.
    Dogs and cats, living together! Mass hysteria!

    Jamsus

  2. #2
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    You might be looking for deeper insight than what I am about to give. But here goes.

    Get the White Balance right. Inside Canon's auto white balance isn't that great IMO. Since you have white walls and grey curtains getting the balance right should be easy.

    Go wide to capture the whole area. Since you're limited to a 18mm you might consider stitching a two or three shot Pano together of the room to give it more width.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Bill W's Avatar
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    Jamsus, in addition to HDNitehawk's suggestions and you should get plenty more. I'm assuming you have a tripod....if not get one.
    Do you have natural light and/or overhead lighting? Do you plan on shooting Jpeg or RAW? This will determine manual WB or AWB.
    For my interior Real Estate shooting; I shoot in RAW, use AWB, and use Live View to balance exposure between outdoor (thru window views) and indoor lighting; i.e. don't overexpose window lighting so you can show your view thru the windows to outside. Stacking will help greatly, but PS and/or LR will help with this issue also.
    If you have a lot of natural lighting shoot earlier or later in the day....the lower angles of light coming in thru the windows makes for easier balancing of exposure.
    I just received the 35 f1.4 ll and like what I'm getting for interior shooting....so try using your 35mm f2 also.
    I'm also assuming there isn't a hardline deadline for this shoot....so start looking at your office as a photo op and start taking pix for practice and to help you make decisions w/your boss on what he would like.
    Good luck, sounds like a "fun" learning experience for you, and I'm sure there will be more thoughts coming your way.
    Bill

  4. #4
    Senior Member jamsus's Avatar
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    Hi guys, thank you everyone for your suggestions i readed them and tried to apply.

    The first bunch of shots are done and we are pretty happy of them, i got only pictures taken from facebook so don't look at the quality, but just to gave you an idea:



    Dogs and cats, living together! Mass hysteria!

    Jamsus

  5. #5
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    Other items to be mindful of include camera tilt. This controls the location of the vanishing points or whether vertical lines will converge or not if you aren't familiar with the other terminology.
    Camera height used will determine whether the ceilings appear high and airy or low and restrictive. Use it to create your desired impression. Much that is published in magazines is shot at chest height to give a sense of vertical space.
    If you can obtain even one flash, perhaps negotiable with your employer, it is possible to use it to light paint on select surfaces and then combine the images as layers in PhotoShop giving amazing levels of control over the lighting in the scene. A light yellow gel will do wonders for warming things up a bit and create some contrast with cooler shadows.

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