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Thread: Fun with a hawk and an adrenaline junky squirrel

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Fun with a hawk and an adrenaline junky squirrel

    So there were 4 attacks. Foggy morning looking at my back yard (fence is for the grandchild - there is a lake in the back). The first I was drinking my coffee with no camera, the 2nd completely out of focus and around the tree, the third you see below, the last was away and through the trees w/o no shots worthwhile. This isn't all that art worthy - really some fun and asking for advice.

    The focus is off - not sure why, it was in servo mode, focus priority, case mode 2, All sensors - I switched to the center 9 later. Would like suggestions on how to get the focus right on this type of shooting.

    This the 2nd taunt by the squirrel - first resulted in a round the tree attack

    MDB_1262 by mbarrett5076, on Flickr

    The chase begins - left side of frame (yes we have lots of squirrels to choose from )

    MDB_1263 by mbarrett5076, on Flickr

    Drawing a bead

    MDB_1264 by mbarrett5076, on Flickr

    Closing in

    MDB_1265 by mbarrett5076, on Flickr

    Looking bad for the squirrel

    MDB_1266 by mbarrett5076, on Flickr

    Tunnell!!! Where the [expletive] did that come from!!!!

    MDB_1267 by mbarrett5076, on Flickr


    One frustrated hawk

    MDB_1268 by mbarrett5076, on Flickr


    I know you are in there

    MDB_1273 by mbarrett5076, on Flickr
    Last edited by Busted Knuckles; 01-09-2016 at 02:49 PM.
    If you see me with a wrench, call 911

  2. #2
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    Good action series .... I suspect the problem is you were to far away and needed a lot more focal length to be able to keep focus points on the bird.....when it moved the camera focused on the background. Very hard to stay focused on something moving when it is so small in the frame. Don't know what you could have done short of using one focus point and being a wizard with hand/eye coordination.

  3. #3
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    Joel - care to identify the hawk? I am useless on identification

    I was using the 70-200 in the earliest parts and it did start to brighten, I thought of going to the 150-600 but didn't want to leave the action. .

    The squirrel was truly egging on the hawk. I don't know if it was decoying (we have a group of about 7 squirrels that work are common in the back yard).
    Last edited by Busted Knuckles; 01-09-2016 at 08:11 PM.
    If you see me with a wrench, call 911

  4. #4
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    Looks like a Coopers Hawk to me

  5. #5
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    Thanks
    If you see me with a wrench, call 911

  6. #6
    Senior Member Bill W's Avatar
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    Nice action shots BK....but you need a longer lens to correct your issues for this type of shooting....what Joel explained technically.
    Your backyard looks like a wonderful outdoor studio for wildlife shooting....if you managed the land beyond the fence and added a few feeders, I think you could start your own lazy man photography zone; i.e. just set up your equipment and wait for the subjects to come to you.

    Bird ID; IDing whether it's a Cooper's or Sharp-shinned hawk is very difficult without identifying many field markings; e.g. size, legs, tail shape, etc., and then add the differences between juvenile and adult birds. I simply call these birds Shoopers until I can gather as many ID markings as I can.....the only field marking I can definitely see in your pix....I went to Flickr and enlarged your shots.....is the lack of the distinct white stripe at the base of its tail feathers. Cooper's have this marking, while the Sharp-shinned is faint to non-existent. But w/out a few more field markings, I'll just call your bird a Shoopers.

    I have a Cooper's and a Sharp-shinned visiting my "outdoor studio" frequently and I take as many shots for field markings to try to correctly identify which bird it is. Here's a link to my Flickr acc't w/a Sharpie id and why I've ID'd it as a Sharpie.

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/wwwake.../in/datetaken/

    BTW....like your fence....we have the same one to keep the dogs in the backyard.
    Last edited by Bill W; 01-10-2016 at 04:29 PM.

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