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Thread: What is your long term archive solution?

  1. #11
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    Prints are good for preservation. For the files I keep current files on computer, in Raid, backing up to an external Raid drive that is offsite. Keepers are backed up online in two cloud storage locations as well.
    Will go with the consensus that you may want to look at publishing a book or two.

  2. #12
    Administrator Sean Setters's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrw View Post
    Will go with the consensus that you may want to look at publishing a book or two.
    Plus, if you make a book, you can add "Published Author" to your resume! :-D

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamsus View Post
    Survive for 2-3 years with HDD \ External HDD Backups or more powerful solution (RAID architecture for backup) then CLOUD everything in 2-3 years the space will be enough
    Sorry, but RAID is absolutely, positively NOT a backup solution. It is simply a way to have one particular storage set survive a drive failure. If a natural event strikes the RAID set, it's just as dead as the next drive. And cloud will struggle to keep up with the needs of photographers, particularly with respect to upload bandwidth.
    We're a Canon/Profoto family: five cameras, sixteen lenses, fifteen Profoto lights, too many modifiers.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean Setters View Post
    Plus, if you make a book, you can add "Published Author" to your resume! :-D
    That would be kinda cool!

  5. #15
    Senior Member Jonathan Huyer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peety3 View Post
    Sorry, but RAID is absolutely, positively NOT a backup solution. It is simply a way to have one particular storage set survive a drive failure. If a natural event strikes the RAID set, it's just as dead as the next drive. And cloud will struggle to keep up with the needs of photographers, particularly with respect to upload bandwidth.
    I've been doing quite okay with cloud backup... I have about 1.4 TB on CrashPlan right now. The upload speed is about 1.5 GB/hour, so when I come home from a major trip and have 500 GB to deal with, yes it could take a while. But who needs to back everything up? At least 95% of the photos I take are junk, so once I do a purge, the cloud backup works just fine. For example on my last bear trip to British Columbia I took 20,000 images. I've pared them down to just over 800, and I could slash even further if I wanted to.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by peety3 View Post
    Sorry, but RAID is absolutely, positively NOT a backup solution. It is simply a way to have one particular storage set survive a drive failure. If a natural event strikes the RAID set, it's just as dead as the next drive. And cloud will struggle to keep up with the needs of photographers, particularly with respect to upload bandwidth.
    Perhaps you wouldn't mind sharing what you do consider to be an effective backup strategy? I ask as RAID storage is part of my redundant drives in multiple locations plan for backup.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Raid's Avatar
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    Well my first backup solution was to use archive grade DVDs.

    I would use the backup catalog feature in Photoshop and burn a new set of DVDs once a year. I would also do a quarterly incremental backup.

    Unfortunately some years back it stopped working, never did workout why.

    Have had a NAS for many years so what I would do is backup my PC (this contains all of my images) to the NAS. Since this NAS was also mirrored to a second NAS everything was safe (that's 3 copies).

    The ideal system would be to use the cloud. The only problem in Australia is that we not only have bandwidth caps, but we also have usage caps. This means that you need to be rich to be able to afford Cloud backup.

    Upload bandwidth and rates are the worst part which means that this would never be a viable option for me
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  8. #18
    Multiple copies....

    Source data on my main computer, managed with Lightroom in year folders, data gets migrated every few years when I buy a new bigger hard drive. Second copy of all my source files on a RAID box connected via ESATA. Third copy on an external hard drive stored at mums away from my house.

    I then have my developed photos, I keep a key set on my computer, a copy goes on my RAID box, another copy on the hard drive at mums, another on my personal USB drive I carry with me to work, plus each photo uploaded to Flickr.

    My source data is good up to a nuke going off over Sheffield, my developed photos are good whilst ever we have electricity !

  9. #19
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    Good to see everyone's varied backup plans.

    Currently I have a separate hard-drive (internal) on my PC with all my photos and that hard-drive is mirrored to a desktop external hard-drive continuously. I also have two external hard-drives which I periodically back-up everything to and keep at two separate locations (my parents house and the office). And for any photos I print (mostly family shots), the jpgs are backed up on-line with the printer.

    I think that is reasonably good, but this thread has me looking into something more permanent as I understand hdd's don't last forever. I like the idea of the m-discs and may implement backing up to several blu-ray discs every so often.

    Stephen

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrw View Post
    Perhaps you wouldn't mind sharing what you do consider to be an effective backup strategy? I ask as RAID storage is part of my redundant drives in multiple locations plan for backup.
    Multiple geographically-dispersed copies, period. One copy at my parents' house, 4 miles by helicopter, 5 miles by car, accessible even when our little town becomes an island during flooding. One copy at my office, 8 miles by helicopter, 14 miles by car, brick building. One copy at my in-laws, 1700 miles by helicopter, 2100 miles by car, concrete exterior walls. 4TB drive handles our archives from 1999 to mid-2010. They don't change, so the backup volumes will remain at their offsite locations undisturbed. 4TB drive handles our archives from mid-2010 to now. At the moment, I'm using a fleet of 7 2TB drives for backups. Three of those handle mid-2010 to mid-2014; those also don't change (except for rare re-edits), so the backup drives remain in place. Four of those handle mid-2014 to present. One sits at home, gets updated every two weeks, and is shuttled to alternating sites as the opportunity presents.

    As much as Lloyd Chambers of DigLloyd/Mac Performance Guide annoys me, he's got a lot of great ideas to share. One of these is to always partition your RAID arrays into 4TB volumes, so the backup process is more manageable. He's definitely onto something.

    Personally, I'd be scared of using a RAID array as any one (or more) of my offsite backups. That array, in almost all cases, needs to be kept as a concise, undisturbed unit, potentially mated to either a hardware RAID card, hardware RAID chassis, or OS/RAID driver/toolset.

    For at least the past 3 years, whenever I've come upon a need to grow my home storage solution, I've contemplated a RAID array, and I just can't swallow the cost. I can use a simple, single SSD for scratch work, with simple 'rsync' to two adjacent HDDs for short-term local triplication, and get great performance from Lightroom etc. Once the job is finished, I sync it to my home archive, and delete from the SSD. I sync to one of the offsite drives, and delete from the first HDD. I swap the offsite drive with one at the office/parents, sync to the returned drive, and delete from the other HDD. Tedious, yes a bit, but the only place that RAID would make a difference (to me) would be at home, to avoid the local HDD sync/deletions.
    We're a Canon/Profoto family: five cameras, sixteen lenses, fifteen Profoto lights, too many modifiers.

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