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Thread: The Importance of Using The Proper Gear

  1. #1
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    The Importance of Using The Proper Gear

    Hi guys,

    I just want to drop a note here that may help someone now or in the future. I started photography many, many years ago (wow, how time flies). I started out with a Rebel kit and then added a macro lens and the 300mm f/4, a few filters and a good sturdy tripod. As time went on, I bought more and sold some. Then the camera got a tad heavier, the lenses a lot bigger and heavier as my passion grew. I gained more skill and more gear ... and I got older.

    I thought I had everything I needed when I went on long hikes ... my tripod, my camera around my neck and my backpack full of lenses. I would bring a macro in case some pretty flowers were seen on the trail or butterflies, etc., a wide-angle for landscape and of course either my 300mm, 100-400mm or 150-600mm (whichever I owned at the time), a flash, etc. I'm not a large woman (only 5' 4" with a few added pounds now) but I carried the gear for long periods with no real struggle. Problem was, I ended up never, ever using my tripod and I have always only used the strap that came with my camera.

    Years later, I now suffer in extreme pain. I am nowhere near retirement age but I cannot stand for long periods of time due to lower back pain and have minimal use of my right hand due to severe wrist pain (Quervain's Tendinitis (or Tenosynovitis). Would I have these problems even if I never took up photography? Maybe, but I do believe photography played a huge role in it coming on this early and this severe.

    So, take my advice please! Use a tripod and use the correct strap on your camera! I truly believe that is the most important gear you can own! You may not think it is that big a deal now but years down the road your body will thank you for making this important investment!

    Just my 2 cents worth!

    Denise

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    Thank you for the advice. Do you think the move to m4/3 provide you with any relief/extend your time w/ our great distraction?
    If you see me with a wrench, call 911

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Busted Knuckles View Post
    Thank you for the advice. Do you think the move to m4/3 provide you with any relief/extend your time w/ our great distraction?
    I am going to look at options. I haven't looked at cameras in a long time so I'm very unfamiliar with what good ones are out there. My phone camera is pretty bad. Someone on fb said she has a mirrorless camera that is very light. I have never looked at any of those so that is something I am going to have to research.

  4. #4
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    So sorry to hear of your troubles.....I had a pretty bad knee injury 2 years ago that completely knocked me out of playing golf, something I started at age 12 and truly loved AND was hoping to play in retirement. I can still handle my camera gear.

    My son-in-law who does a lot weddings and other photo related gigs has almost completely switched away from his Canon gear to the Fuji mirrorless system.....it is amazingly small and light. The image quality is great even though it is a small sensor. The AF is not as good for action shots but otherwise it is a very capable system. The body and 3 or 4 lenses can fit in a small pouch about the size of a shaving kit or fanny pack.

    Sincerely hope you feel better soon....don't give up....you're too talented behind the lens!!!

    (My son-in-law's web site showing images with Fuji mirrorless: http://www.josephabell.com)
    Last edited by Joel Eade; 10-24-2017 at 04:59 PM.

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    So sorry to hear of your medical problems. I have had diabetes for 24 years and have various complications, including foot problems. I no longer shoot events, or anything that might have me on my feet for a long time. I picked up a Sony A6000 2 years ago in hopes of switching, but while the size was nice, the battery life, the AF and long exposure issues (more than 30 seconds) means I won't be switching any time soon. I have been slowly moving to lenses with IS built in though.

    Almost 4 years ago I took a 10 day trip to Arizona and Colorado. I took nearly every lens & both Canon bodies I had at the time, along with a notebook. At the end of the trip, 80% of my photos used an UWA zoom and the other 20% were mostly from 2 other lenses. After that, I started to be smarter at what I bring, unless I am driving, usually picking 2-3 lenses and either camera body (Canon FF or A6000).

    I also don't use the camera strap....from my event days I found using a hand strap was easier for quick movements, and I didn't have that huge weight on my neck.

    I am attracted to the IBIS from Sony though and if they can get the long exposure issues corrected (I have a sky tracker), then I could see moving to Sony in the future.

    Hope the pain can be managed and you begin to feel better soon!
    ---
    Way too much gear and even more lighting equipment.

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    Thanks guys!

    I am seriously thinking of selling all of my gear and purchase something that is much lighter and manageable. Any recommendations highly appreciated. I'd be happy settling for a decent macro and a portrait lens. Although, I do love my Lensbaby Velvet 56. I don't know if there is an adapter that would make it and my Sigma macro lens fit on a lighter camera. I will so miss having a long lens but I have to face my new reality.

    I currently have my Sigma 150-600mm C up for sale if anyone is looking for one.

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    Denise,
    It is surprising the number of adapters there are that fit Canon lenses. Whatever mirrorless system you choose, you should have an adapter to your favorite Lenses. Also, I believe that Sigma will change mounts for a fee.

    If you had a Canon Tilt Shift I would be interested....LOL
    ---
    Way too much gear and even more lighting equipment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Manofmayo66 View Post
    Denise,
    It is surprising the number of adapters there are that fit Canon lenses. Whatever mirrorless system you choose, you should have an adapter to your favorite Lenses. Also, I believe that Sigma will change mounts for a fee.

    If you had a Canon Tilt Shift I would be interested....LOL
    Thank you for the info! Sorry, no tilt-shift lenses! Although, I used to own the 90mm tilt shift and absolutely loved it!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ddt0725 View Post
    Thank you for the info! Sorry, no tilt-shift lenses! Although, I used to own the 90mm tilt shift and absolutely loved it!
    I have the 90mm Tilt Shift and love it! Would like to get the 24mm TS v2, however I just can't stomach the price new....
    ---
    Way too much gear and even more lighting equipment.

  10. #10
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    Denise,

    Agreed with others, sorry to hear about your issues.

    I would encourage some ergonomic advances before giving up too much gear. I've found the black rapid strap gets the weight off my neck and onto a single shoulder, which helps a lot. A chest harness would put the weight on both shoulders and I've seen a variety of systems that would put the weight on a belt to avoid your back entirely.

    Second, is limiting the gear you take with you. I am often guilty of trying to take the perfect lens for every occasion. But I have found two things:
    • I do not need pictures of every occasion. I just need pictures to document my trip, or to remember an event. Therefore, i tend to only use a few lenses.
    • Limiting lenses can often spur creativity. It is like walking around with a 50 mm prime. You capture everything through that perspective. Next trip, you walk around with a telephoto. Then you capture everything with that perspective. Ultimately, you can get great shots either way.


    If you do decide going smaller is necessary, I am very impressed with the IQ ability of recent cropped sensors. We both came in with the 7D. But the current crop sensors are much better. I have heard great things about the SL2 and I very much enjoy the IQ from my M3. However, I will say, the lenses are "good", but I would only call the EFM 11-22 to be a "great" lens.

    That said, the Sony and Fuji get more hype, but the Canon "M" system is very capable. You want a marco, the EFM 28 mm macro is very solid. The EFm 11-22, while not fast, is darn near an "L" lens optically.

    Sorry to hear about your troubles, I would start by working on ergonomics, limiting what you are carrying, but if need be, I am sure you could take some amazing pics with smaller systems.

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