Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Discussion: OVF vs EVF

  1. #1
    Super Moderator Kayaker72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    4,538

    Discussion: OVF vs EVF

    I will admit, the vast majority of my EVF experience is on the EVF-DC1 and now the EVF-DC2. First, yes, both are dated and I hope the EVFs in the R and RP are technically better. I also hope that the EVF in the upcoming R5 and R6 are even better. Second, for those that care, yes, the DC2 is slightly better than the DC1. Maybe a bit better in resolution, but mostly in tones and color. But, if you are reasonably happy with the DC1, I would not rush out to get the DC2. I mostly have one as I wanted to test it and it was essentially free in a kit with my M6II.

    That said, I have been trying to treat the M6II with the DC2 mounted on it as my primary camera for the last two weeks just to see if I could get used to the EVF. I have gotten used to it to the point where it is completely viable. As I know a few other people have been using EVFs, and I thought I could start a discussion and maybe you've found a work around to some of my "cons" or maybe there are other pros/cons that I have not yet considered.

    So, my list:

    "Pros" to an EVF compared to the OVF:
    • Information available. Histograms, levels, settings, you name it, if you've seen it on the back of your camera during Liveview, it can be displayed in the EVF. This is very handy.
    • What you see in the EVF is what you will get as your picture. The exposure in the EVF is the same as the image. I find myself making a lot more 1/3 stop type adjustments using the EVF and that some guess work is taken out.
    • Love touch and drag on the LCD screen. My nose touches that top left of the screen, so I am set up for touch and drag on the top right portion. My nose does not interfere and this is a great feature. Could they do this for OVFs? Not sure, but they haven't to the best of my knowledge.


    "Pros" to an EVF compared to the back of camera LCD:
    • I am not sure where this will end up, but I am 500-600 shots taken on the M6 II, plenty of time in menus and looking at photos, and the battery has not lost a bar much less needed to be recharged. EVF shooting seems to save a lot of energy
    • Of course, most people prefer shooting with the camera up to your eye.


    "Cons" to an EVF compared to an OVF:
    • Where the EVF displays what the camera "sees", an OVF displays what you "see." This is actually pretty significant to me and is the negative side of the second bullet. The main issues:
      • I can't tell you how many times I've pick up the M6II, thrown it up to my eye and EVF is either black or blown out. Sure, I adjust settings immediately, so knowing my exposure was wrong was useful, but I also lost the feel of the scene/moment. I am a hobbyist, I shoot for fun. It isn't fun to get excited about a scene, throw your camera up and not see that scene.
        • This is largely because I shoot manual. As you switch to more automated modes (Tv/Av), what I am seeing with the EVF-DC2 on the M6II is a lag, maybe up to a second, as the EVF adjusts.

      • Shooting with both eyes open. I tend to shoot with by left eye closed, but I am trying to learn to shoot with it open or I often go from shooting to evaluating the scene to shooting again. Going back and forth from the natural scene to an artificial scene is unsettling to me. I was getting used to having both eyes open with an OVF. With an EVF, I just do not see that happening. It is unnatural.
      • DOF is in play here as well. What will be oof in an image is oof in the EVF. The pro is above, what you see in the EVF is what you'll get in the picture, but the con is that while looking through the EVF, your eye cannot dart around assessing the scene unless you are also modifying the focus point.

    • DR. Yep, dynamic range. I am not sure what the DR is of the OLED is, but I am pretty sure I've heard that most panels are 8 stops with the best up to 10 stops. What I do know is that the EVF-DC2 does not have enough DR to capture the range of even slightly contrasty scenes. Could this be improved? Maybe. But I am seeing a lot of blown highlights and crushed blacks which do impede your ability to assess the entire scene.
    • Eye strain. I have not experienced this yet, as I haven't shot with it continuously up to my eye, but I have read several reports that if you shoot for extended periods of time, an EVF is harder on your eyes than an OVF.


    How are other people liking EVFs? Any other pros/cons?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Jonathan Huyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Canmore, Alberta
    Posts
    1,003
    I don't own a mirrorless camera, but I'm quite interested in getting people's feedback on these points. Plus, I'm also curious as to how the quality holds up when you are shooting at high ISO levels (like around 6400). Does the image start to fall apart in the viewfinder?

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Kayaker72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    4,538
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Huyer View Post
    I don't own a mirrorless camera, but I'm quite interested in getting people's feedback on these points. Plus, I'm also curious as to how the quality holds up when you are shooting at high ISO levels (like around 6400). Does the image start to fall apart in the viewfinder?
    Honestly, really not that bad. I'll try again later when it is dark, but here is ISO 12,800 just now. Taken with my iPhone held up to the EVF

    Name:  IMG_1155.jpg
Views: 108
Size:  97.1 KB

  4. #4
    Senior Member Dave Throgmartin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    1,039
    I could see myself eventually giving mirrorless another go, but truthfully times are tough right now economically and I'm not sure it is going to be better soon. The 6D2 is good enough.

    Dave

  5. #5
    Super Moderator Kayaker72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    4,538
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Huyer View Post
    I don't own a mirrorless camera, but I'm quite interested in getting people's feedback on these points. Plus, I'm also curious as to how the quality holds up when you are shooting at high ISO levels (like around 6400). Does the image start to fall apart in the viewfinder?
    I got up too late for a sunrise picture. I know with older cameras, the back lcd could get very noisy in some circumstances like before sunrise. So far, I am not really seeing it in the EVF. Either pixel binning or something else may be going on here, but noise seems well handled.


    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Throgmartin View Post
    I could see myself eventually giving mirrorless another go, but truthfully times are tough right now economically and I'm not sure it is going to be better soon. The 6D2 is good enough.

    Dave
    Totally makes sense. The 6D2 is a great camera and should work great for you for the foreseeable future.

    Personally, I am not sure I want a mirrorless as my primary camera. I picked up the M6 II last fall in part to replace the M3 and give the M system another chance, but also to assess how I like mirrorless...and, for that matter, the latest APS-C sensor. So, I have been impressed with the M6 II as I've used it here or there. It feels and acts like a small legitimate camera. I decided to give it a real go and have shot exclusively with it for 2-3 weeks now. I am working my more detailed opinions, but there are pros and cons to AF, EVFs, etc.

    Here is to hoping everyone is being smart, safe and that the more extreme effects are confined to March/April.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    118
    At present I'm really happy with the combination of a DSLR and an M. The M is supremely portable and discreet. Your can disappear as a tourist, or carry it on a backpacking trip without trouble. I did a challenging trek a few years ago with a load of heavy DSLR gear. That was my never again moment I still prefer my DSLR when portability and discretion aren't factors.

    The benefit of the EFV that I enjoy most is the ease of focusing on still subjects, primarily for landscapes or portraits. Just touching/selecting the spot on the EFV that I want to focus on is really intuitive. Phase/contrast/dual pixel combinations have brought these systems pretty close together, but overall I do prefer the focusing function of an EVF/mirrorless setup.
    Last edited by PatrickH; 04-25-2020 at 07:49 PM.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    366
    My only experience with an EVF is on the M5. (PatrickH nicely summed up the times when I would use the M system.) On some occasions as a tourist or for quick family shots, I can be distracted from checking the exposure meter. BUT the EVF always lets me know if I have an OOPS! exposure setting.

    I have a fully manual Rokinon 12 mm lens for the M5, so the focus peaking in the EVF is a major plus when I use that lens.

    For occasions when I am attending to the photography, I use my DSLR. Then I still like the OVF a little better. Sometimes the color rendition in the EVF seems slightly off, which can be distracting.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    366
    Upon reflection the problem with rendition in the EVF is likely related to dynamic range instead of truly "color rendition", but it still sometimes spoils the sense of the scene.

  9. #9
    Super Moderator Kayaker72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    4,538
    Quote Originally Posted by Minerve101 View Post
    Upon reflection the problem with rendition in the EVF is likely related to dynamic range instead of truly "color rendition", but it still sometimes spoils the sense of the scene.
    Very true. I have not shot enough with the EVF on the M6II that I am used to it and actually like aspects of it. But the fact that you are not seeing the full extent of the natural image (DR/tones/etc) is part of the reality of using an EVF.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •