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Thread: Solar filter

  1. #11
    Senior Member Jonathan Huyer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by neuroanatomist View Post
    That was my plan. The 10x42 IS takes 52mm threaded filters.
    I ordered binocular solar filters from the same company I got the camera lens filter, because I like the idea of an unthreaded filter you can slip off easily. During the total phase, you will want to use the binoculars to see the intricate details of the corona, prominences, and all that good stuff. So having a filter you can pull off quickly would be an advantage. Or, have a second pair of binoculars handy (unfiltered) that you can grab quickly.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Jonathan Huyer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HDNitehawk View Post
    Wouldn't it be the same as using live view. I did live view on all the shots with the 500mm on the last one.
    I would think with the high frame rate of the R3 you will can have quite a few shots through total. Or just one or so at 196 fps.
    What I'm wondering specifically, is how the image would look in the viewfinder for a mirrorless camera, if you compared it to a DSLR side by side. The EVF is giving a 'TV screen' view of the scene, whereas the DSLR is showing you the real McCoy. For most scenes they look pretty similar, but a solar eclipse is a very unique situation with incredible dynamic range. I expect that the actual photos each camera will produce will be quite similar, but for anyone who has taken a picture of a solar eclipse already knows, the picture doesn't come anywhere near to what it actually looks like through the optical viewfinder (or binoculars). So my question is whether the EVF will have similar limitations, such that you're perhaps better off viewing the eclipse through binoculars while taking photos with the mirrorless camera, just so you don't miss out on the full experience.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Huyer View Post
    What I'm wondering specifically, is how the image would look in the viewfinder for a mirrorless camera, if you compared it to a DSLR side by side. The EVF is giving a 'TV screen' view of the scene, whereas the DSLR is showing you the real McCoy. For most scenes they look pretty similar, but a solar eclipse is a very unique situation with incredible dynamic range. I expect that the actual photos each camera will produce will be quite similar, but for anyone who has taken a picture of a solar eclipse already knows, the picture doesn't come anywhere near to what it actually looks like through the optical viewfinder (or binoculars). So my question is whether the EVF will have similar limitations, such that you're perhaps better off viewing the eclipse through binoculars while taking photos with the mirrorless camera, just so you don't miss out on the full experience.
    I think the big difference would be the quick adjustment you have to make to get the picture exposure. Initially all you will see is a black screen in either and be frantically changing the shutter speed as you pull the cap off. A DSLR you see what you see, but I think you know as well that what you see through the 1D viewfinder is better than what you see in a lesser body. So you will loose site of the sun if you are doing it hand held. What you describe would be great, but the sun moves quickly out of view with the 500 or 600mm. You are talking adjusting, tracking and looking through the binoculars in a period of time less than what it took me to type this.

    What would be good to have is a mount for the tripod that can track the sun, have a good idea of the required shutter speed so you can quickly go to it.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Jonathan Huyer's Avatar
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    Yes for sure, with regards to picture exposure, you would need to be ready in advance of the total phase. For the 2017 eclipse, I didn't bother taking any photos in the partial phase. I simply used the lens with solar filter as a means to view the eclipse. I had the camera preset for the total phase, which involved using exposure bracketing. I set up the bracketing for 7 shots with 1-stop gap, using a base ISO, aperture, and shutter speed that I got from reference material. I had the drive mode on high speed, and used a remote cable to actuate the shutter. So all I would have to do is make sure the image was still in the middle of the frame, and hold the button down while the 7 shots were taken each time. The bracketing was enough to ensure that I got the prominences (at the low end of the exposure) to the intricate details of the corona (at the high end of the exposure).

    I think a potential disadvantage to using a mirrorless camera for the eclipse is that in order to view the partial phase, you would need to have the exposure set for that particular condition. Then you would have to switch rapidly to the new settings for the total phase. With the DSLR, it doesn't matter of course what your settings are --- the viewfinder image will be the same. So if you're like me and don't care for photos of the partial phase, then you can do it as I described. Or, just take photos of the partial phase after totality, so you aren't in a panic to switch.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Jonathan Huyer's Avatar
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    As examples of what I got with bracketing:

    1/30 sec @ f/5.6, ISO 200



    1/1000 sec @ f/5.6, ISO 200



    Note that with an optical viewfinder, you'll see the prominences at the same time that you see the incredible detail in the corona, but only with your eye. The camera can't capture both at the same time, due to the huge dynamic range between them. With a mirrorless camera, you will need to physically change the settings to see the prominences or the full corona, because what you see is what you get.

  6. #16
    Senior Member neuroanatomist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Huyer View Post
    What I'm wondering specifically, is how the image would look in the viewfinder for a mirrorless camera, if you compared it to a DSLR side by side. The EVF is giving a 'TV screen' view of the scene, whereas the DSLR is showing you the real McCoy. For most scenes they look pretty similar, but a solar eclipse is a very unique situation with incredible dynamic range. I expect that the actual photos each camera will produce will be quite similar, but for anyone who has taken a picture of a solar eclipse already knows, the picture doesn't come anywhere near to what it actually looks like through the optical viewfinder (or binoculars). So my question is whether the EVF will have similar limitations, such that you're perhaps better off viewing the eclipse through binoculars while taking photos with the mirrorless camera, just so you don't miss out on the full experience.
    Yes, the EVF will have the same limitations as the captured images. Probably the "OVF Simulation' mode of the R3 will be better in that regard, but it's still not going to match an OVF in that situation. Agree that viewing with binoculars would be better, but I think that's generally true anyway for both solar and lunar eclipses.

  7. #17
    Senior Member neuroanatomist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Huyer View Post
    As examples of what I got with bracketing:
    1/30 sec @ f/5.6, ISO 200
    1/1000 sec @ f/5.6, ISO 200
    With just the shutter speed changing, that's pretty easy to adjust rapidly on the fly. That's a 5-stop difference, so it's within the range of AEB and since the R3 brackets at 30 fps with full 14-bit RAW honestly it's probably easiest just to take bracketed exposures and either combine them or delete the unwanted ones.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Jonathan Huyer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by neuroanatomist View Post
    With just the shutter speed changing, that's pretty easy to adjust rapidly on the fly. That's a 5-stop difference, so it's within the range of AEB and since the R3 brackets at 30 fps with full 14-bit RAW honestly it's probably easiest just to take bracketed exposures and either combine them or delete the unwanted ones.
    Yes good point --- it's pretty easy and quick to make the changes. I'd still suggest rehearsing the moves ahead of time, because the event is so utterly phenomenal that you can temporarily lose your mind while being in the midst of it. If you're already an eclipse veteran then you'll probably be a bit more level headed, but even though the 2017 eclipse was my third, I was still massively overwhelmed. Maybe it's just me, but I find these events so paralyzing that I almost forget to breathe! I'm sure looking forward to next April, and I wish everyone clear skies wherever you may be.

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    Jonathon, are going to try tobhit the annular in October? I will be in Vegas on the 12th will be staying over for it.
    If you see me with a wrench, call 911

  10. #20
    Senior Member Jonathan Huyer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Busted Knuckles View Post
    Jonathon, are going to try tobhit the annular in October? I will be in Vegas on the 12th will be staying over for it.
    Regrets, I'm going to miss it. For me, an annular eclipse is pretty cool, sort of like a lunar eclipse, but not "exciting" enough to warrant a special trip. I did see one in San Diego about 30 years ago, which worked out well because I had family there at the time. It happened right at sunset, which was super cool because we could see the eclipsed sun setting into the ocean. I hope it works out for you!

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