Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 34

Thread: Solar filter

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1
    Senior Member Jonathan Huyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Canmore, Alberta
    Posts
    1,251

    Solar filter

    For next year's solar eclipse, I'm aiming to use my 500 f/4 lens. I searched around for solar filters, and came across this one. I'm quite pleased with the whole setup so I thought I'd share. I bought mine in Canada, so you'll just need to search for "Baader solar filter" to find a distributor near you. Note that there are quite a few models, and I spent a fair bit of time going through them all before settling on the ASTF 120 for my lens. It is a perfect fit. It holds on by friction and is quite secure, but it's also easy to pull it off quickly for the total phase of the eclipse.






  2. #2
    Senior Member neuroanatomist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    3,845
    Thanks, Jonathan. Based on your efforts, the 140mm version should work well for the 600/4. B&H sells them (as special order items, with 2-4 week delivery; Google shows other US suppliers with stock on hand). I'll need to decide whether I'm going to take the 600/4, or use the RF 100-300/2.8 with a TC.

    My older daughter is very excited about the eclipse, and at her request we are planning to drive up to New Hampshire for the event.
    Last edited by neuroanatomist; 07-24-2023 at 02:22 PM.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Jonathan Huyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Canmore, Alberta
    Posts
    1,251
    Quote Originally Posted by neuroanatomist View Post
    Thanks, Jonathan. Based on your efforts, the 140mm version should work well for the 600/4. B&H sells them (as special order items, with 2-4 week delivery; Google shows other US suppliers with stock on hand). I'll need to decide whether I'm going to take the 600/4, or use the RF 100-300/2.8 with a TC.

    My older daughter is very excited about the eclipse, and at her request we are planning to drive up to New Hampshire for the event.
    Glad this is useful. I take it you're planning to use the R3? I'm curious how the eclipse will appear in the electronic viewfinder, compared to the optical viewfinder of my 1DXIII. There are incredible nuances in the corona, and a huge dynamic range, that the EVF might not be able to display. You'll get the same photos (if not better) with the R3, but for the personal viewing experience, I'm wondering if it will match the optical view.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Planet Earth
    Posts
    3,110
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Huyer View Post
    Glad this is useful. I take it you're planning to use the R3? I'm curious how the eclipse will appear in the electronic viewfinder, compared to the optical viewfinder of my 1DXIII. There are incredible nuances in the corona, and a huge dynamic range, that the EVF might not be able to display. You'll get the same photos (if not better) with the R3, but for the personal viewing experience, I'm wondering if it will match the optical view.
    Wouldn't it be the same as using live view. I did live view on all the shots with the 500mm on the last one.
    I would think with the high frame rate of the R3 you will can have quite a few shots through total. Or just one or so at 196 fps.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Jonathan Huyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Canmore, Alberta
    Posts
    1,251
    Quote Originally Posted by HDNitehawk View Post
    Wouldn't it be the same as using live view. I did live view on all the shots with the 500mm on the last one.
    I would think with the high frame rate of the R3 you will can have quite a few shots through total. Or just one or so at 196 fps.
    What I'm wondering specifically, is how the image would look in the viewfinder for a mirrorless camera, if you compared it to a DSLR side by side. The EVF is giving a 'TV screen' view of the scene, whereas the DSLR is showing you the real McCoy. For most scenes they look pretty similar, but a solar eclipse is a very unique situation with incredible dynamic range. I expect that the actual photos each camera will produce will be quite similar, but for anyone who has taken a picture of a solar eclipse already knows, the picture doesn't come anywhere near to what it actually looks like through the optical viewfinder (or binoculars). So my question is whether the EVF will have similar limitations, such that you're perhaps better off viewing the eclipse through binoculars while taking photos with the mirrorless camera, just so you don't miss out on the full experience.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Planet Earth
    Posts
    3,110
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Huyer View Post
    What I'm wondering specifically, is how the image would look in the viewfinder for a mirrorless camera, if you compared it to a DSLR side by side. The EVF is giving a 'TV screen' view of the scene, whereas the DSLR is showing you the real McCoy. For most scenes they look pretty similar, but a solar eclipse is a very unique situation with incredible dynamic range. I expect that the actual photos each camera will produce will be quite similar, but for anyone who has taken a picture of a solar eclipse already knows, the picture doesn't come anywhere near to what it actually looks like through the optical viewfinder (or binoculars). So my question is whether the EVF will have similar limitations, such that you're perhaps better off viewing the eclipse through binoculars while taking photos with the mirrorless camera, just so you don't miss out on the full experience.
    I think the big difference would be the quick adjustment you have to make to get the picture exposure. Initially all you will see is a black screen in either and be frantically changing the shutter speed as you pull the cap off. A DSLR you see what you see, but I think you know as well that what you see through the 1D viewfinder is better than what you see in a lesser body. So you will loose site of the sun if you are doing it hand held. What you describe would be great, but the sun moves quickly out of view with the 500 or 600mm. You are talking adjusting, tracking and looking through the binoculars in a period of time less than what it took me to type this.

    What would be good to have is a mount for the tripod that can track the sun, have a good idea of the required shutter speed so you can quickly go to it.

  7. #7
    Senior Member neuroanatomist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    3,845
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Huyer View Post
    What I'm wondering specifically, is how the image would look in the viewfinder for a mirrorless camera, if you compared it to a DSLR side by side. The EVF is giving a 'TV screen' view of the scene, whereas the DSLR is showing you the real McCoy. For most scenes they look pretty similar, but a solar eclipse is a very unique situation with incredible dynamic range. I expect that the actual photos each camera will produce will be quite similar, but for anyone who has taken a picture of a solar eclipse already knows, the picture doesn't come anywhere near to what it actually looks like through the optical viewfinder (or binoculars). So my question is whether the EVF will have similar limitations, such that you're perhaps better off viewing the eclipse through binoculars while taking photos with the mirrorless camera, just so you don't miss out on the full experience.
    Yes, the EVF will have the same limitations as the captured images. Probably the "OVF Simulation' mode of the R3 will be better in that regard, but it's still not going to match an OVF in that situation. Agree that viewing with binoculars would be better, but I think that's generally true anyway for both solar and lunar eclipses.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Jonathan Huyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Canmore, Alberta
    Posts
    1,251
    Also - New Hampshire has a low probability of clear skies on eclipse day, unfortunately (cloud cover > 70% typical). Locations farther south are better. https://eclipsophile.com/wp-content/...ntre-cloud.png
    Last edited by Jonathan Huyer; 07-24-2023 at 09:12 PM.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Planet Earth
    Posts
    3,110
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Huyer View Post
    Also - New Hampshire has a low probability of clear skies on eclipse day, unfortunately (cloud cover > 70% typical). Locations farther south are better. https://eclipsophile.com/wp-content/...ntre-cloud.png
    Weathermen fail at predicting the weather tomorrow, counting on patterns is at best unreliable. Last year we had one of the hottest summers on record and this year record rainfall in the driest month of the year.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Big Mouse Florida
    Posts
    1,174
    For the annular on 10/14 will be along the line in Nevada or Utah in the BAM 'boondocking' and will be using my 1200 russian mirror w a solar film fits nicely in my friction fit clear filter.

    If anyone is interested Vegas or St. George Utah are not far and could pick anyone up at that airport(s). Will have the Jeep so travel is fairly easy and nearly anywhere we would like to go.
    Last edited by Busted Knuckles; 07-24-2023 at 11:24 PM.
    If you see me with a wrench, call 911

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •